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South Sudan: Building the Blocks of Peace

Ask your politicians not to turn their backs on the people of South Sudan.

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We’d love to share how your support is having a positive impact on people's lives, and other ways you can help people live free from fear.

South Sudan has been gripped by a civil war for the last 4.5 years.

Almost 400,000 people have been killed. Two million are internally displaced within South Sudan and 2 million are refugees in neighbouring countries. 

Another peace deal was signed in August this year. But it is a fragile peace and one that brings little safety, comfort or security to communities.

Our governments have responded diplomatically and financially to mitigate the effects of conflict, but more is needed if the fragile peace is to be lasting for the people of South Sudan.

Will you ask your elected representatives to not turn their back on the people of South Sudan?

Dear Deputy,

Protracted crises like those in South Sudan and Yemen must be stopped. Anything less would be a violation of our collective human responsibility to promote and protect the rights of the world’s most vulnerable people.

South Sudan, the world’s newest country, after seceding from Sudan in 2011, has been gripped by a civil war for the last 4.5 years.

Almost 400,000 people have been killed since fighting broke out in 2013 following the political power struggle between President Salva Kiir and his former deputy Mr Riek Machar. 7.5 million people, over 50 per cent of the population, are currently in need of emergency aid to survive. Almost 4 million people have fled their homes because of the conflict; 2 million are displaced within South Sudan and 2 million are refugees in neighbouring countries.

The layers of conflict in South Sudan are many, with the roots of the conflict going deep.

Another peace deal was signed in August this year, the 12th since 2013. But it is a fragile peace and one that brings little safety, comfort or security to communities. It is essential that the international community stays engaged to ensure this peace deal holds.

In addition to the fear and insecurity being experienced by the South Sudanese because of conflict, communities are also facing severe food shortages due to drought and poverty. In Yirol State, where Trócaire is supporting internally displaced people who have fled the fighting, it is predicted that by the end of the year communities will be in ‘catastrophe’*. This means people will face extreme levels of acute food insecurity.

The needs of these displaced communities are many and are being met by local organisations, including partners of Trócaire.

Trócaire, in partnership with CAFOD is providing food, water, sanitation, seeds and tools to communities to help support people to meet their basic needs. These efforts are important in tackling some of the root causes of the conflict, but meeting basic needs alone is not enough. Trust and confidence, that is essential for peace, must be built among leaders and communities.

Trócaire in partnership CAFOD and Christian Aid is also working closely with local churches in building peace across South Sudan. Churches play a vital role in peace efforts as they hold the respect and trust of all community members and leaders in South Sudan. The South Sudan Council of Churches has developed an Action Plan for Peace; this home-grown and church-led framework for sustainable peace, not only addresses the root causes of conflict, but brings warring communities together for reconciliation and mutual cooperation and trust. In addition, it seeks to ensure that the voices of the South Sudanese people are represented in grassroot and higher-level peace processes. These kinds of conflict resolution and peacebuilding efforts must continue to be supported.

In 2017, Ireland provided funding of almost €12 million to South Sudan. In May this year a further €4 million was allocated. At that time the Tánaiste said ‘Ireland will continue to support the international humanitarian response to the crisis, as well as supporting efforts to halt the on-going conflict driving it. We urgently need to turn the tide of human suffering in South Sudan through reaching political resolution to the conflict.’

While I welcome Ireland’s diplomatic and funding efforts to date, continued efforts are needed if this fragile peace is to be lasting.

Deputy, will you ask the Tánaiste Simon Coveney on my behalf to:

1. Ensure Ireland increases its diplomatic efforts, through the EU, to ensure South Sudan’s fragile peace deals holds.

2. Continue to support the humanitarian efforts in South Sudan that are addressing the root causes of the conflict.

3. Continue to fund and support the vital conflict resolution & peacebuilding efforts at community level by South Sudan Council of Churches in partnership with INGOs.

Ireland has made positive contributions diplomatically and financially to mitigate the effects of conflicts in South Sudan and Yemen. As a champion of peace and as Ireland embarks on a campaign to secure a seat on the UN Security Council, the protection of civilians in conflict and respect for international humanitarian law must be our consistent messages.

Yours sincerely

*The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Key Findings: September 2018 – March 2019

Dear MP,

Protracted crises like those in South Sudan and Yemen must be stopped. Anything less would be a violation of our collective human responsibility to promote and protect the rights of the world’s most vulnerable people.

South Sudan, the world’s newest country, after seceding from Sudan in 2011, has been gripped by a civil war for the last 4.5 years.

Almost 400,000 people have been killed since fighting broke out in 2013 following the political power struggle between President Salva Kiir and his former deputy Mr Riek Machar. 7.5 million people, over 50 per cent of the population, are currently in need of emergency aid to survive. Almost 4 million people have fled their homes because of the conflict; 2 million are displaced within South Sudan and 2 million are refugees in neighbouring countries.

The layers of conflict in South Sudan are many, with the roots of the conflict going deep.

Another peace deal was signed in August this year, the 12th since 2013. But it is a fragile peace and one that brings little safety, comfort or security to communities. It is essential that the international community stays engaged to ensure this peace deal holds.

In addition to the fear and insecurity being experienced by the South Sudanese because of conflict, communities are also facing severe food shortages due to drought and poverty. In Yirol State, where Trócaire is supporting internally displaced people who have fled the fighting, it is predicted that by the end of the year communities will be in ‘catastrophe’*. This means people will face extreme levels of acute food insecurity.

The needs of these displaced communities are many and are being met by local organisations, including partners of Trócaire.

Trócaire, in partnership with CAFOD is providing food, water, sanitation, seeds and tools to communities to help support people to meet their basic needs. These efforts are important in tackling some of the root causes of the conflict, but meeting basic needs alone is not enough. Trust and confidence, that is essential for peace, must be built among leaders and communities.

Trócaire in partnership CAFOD and Christian Aid is also working closely with local churches in building peace across South Sudan. Churches play a vital role in peace efforts as they hold the respect and trust of all community members and leaders in South Sudan. The South Sudan Council of Churches has developed an Action Plan for Peace; this home-grown and church-led framework for sustainable peace, not only addresses the root causes of conflict, but brings warring communities together for reconciliation and mutual cooperation and trust. In addition, it seeks to ensure that the voices of the South Sudanese people are represented in grassroot and higher-level peace processes. These kinds of conflict resolution and peacebuilding efforts must continue to be supported.

DFID has a planned budget of £130 million for South Sudan 2019/20**. The UK as a member of the Troika with US and Norway, has been very closely engaged with the situation in South Sudan. Its Special Envoy is supporting international efforts to secure a durable and peaceful resolution to conflict. While I welcome the UK’s diplomatic and funding efforts to date, continued efforts are needed if this fragile peace is to be lasting.

MP, will you ask The Secretary of State for International Development Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt on my behalf to:

1. Ensure the UK continues to engage strongly on South Sudan to ensure that the high-level peace process results in sustainable peace beyond elite deals.

2. Continue to support the humanitarian efforts in South Sudan that are addressing the root causes of the conflict.

3. Continue to fund and support the vital conflict resolution & peacebuilding efforts at community level by South Sudan Council of Churches in partnership with INGOs.

During our own turbulent times, we must not forget the people of South Sudan.

Yours sincerely


*The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Key Findings: September 2018 – March 2019


** https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/723770/South-Sudan-July-2018.pdf